About your Search

20130101
20130131
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
, and ambassador from malta. and, of course, a special welcome to ambassador alexis tsipras, the u.s. ambassador to hungary. so many of you are here. i know many were here for the inauguration, the first working day of the second term. our first major event here at brookings in the second term. and yesterday president obama's second inaugural address has already called a manifesto for liberalism, bolstered his supporters on a range of issues, and his credits are already complaining he is preaching to the choir, or worse, that he reaffirmed the worst feelings, that he is a socialist. and president obama anticipated that criticism by putting his talk into the context of his include ongoing skepticism of central authority, and calling it a fiction that all societies ill can be served through government alone. and as the u.s. looks around the world today, president obama highlighted a few big challenges, asia, africa, latin america and the middle east. but, frankly, americans are used to trouble in those places. but for the last three years for the first time since the end of the cold war, europe ha
schwartzman. now i'd like to recognize alexis herman. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you so much. and i am so very pleased to announce after yesterday's glorious inauguration and perhaps a late-night celebration that 317 democratic national committee members have registered in person for this meeting, and where 47, for a total 364 out of 460 members. so yes, madam chair, our democratic national committee is here at it is about our president. take back the house, elected democrats at every level of government and fight for our values for 100% of the american people. thank you. thank you, madam chair. [applause] >> thank you, secretary. the next item on the committee's agenda is the report from the credentials committee. i'd like to recognize co-chairs to give us an update on this. >> in a. >> thank you, madam chair. on the have of the rest of the potential committee we are honored to present our report. >> the credentials committee received a challenge to the election of dnc members from the state of georgia, and a challenge to the election process used in the election of dnc memb
proposal in washington. with us now is alexi, noah's uncle. i understand you had concerns that your voice, your family's voice was not being heard by the white house. you just heard from them moments ago. what did they say? >> that's correct. the white house contacted me on my way -- while i was on my way to the show. i had sent an e-mail about eight days ago to an aide of president obama asking questions about whether the families would have an opportunity to speak about the proposal. and an opportunity to be heard. and i never received a response to that e-mail. according to the call i just received, it was a miscommunication at the white house. and that's why there was no response to the e-mail. they apologized for that. >> why do you think they reached out to you now? one of our producers called them today in anticipation of the interview to get a comment and i think the associated press also ran a story on it, too. do you think that's what did it? >> i think to help them understand the situation better in terms of the family's desire to speak to vice president biden. my understanding
to become miss america. but for most of her early life, alexis weinman spent her time alone. >> i was very quiet because i couldn't say anything right. i was picked on for the way i spoke. i really didn't have any friends. >> her parents knew there was something wrong but their small town of cutbank, montana didn't have the resources to help them figure out what it was. at the age of 11, a doctor finally put a name to her condition. pervasive development disorder. a mild form of autism. typically children with autism are very intelligent but very quiet. socially awkward and don't respond appropriately to interactions with other people. typically, they don't end up becoming beauty queens either but she says one day she simply decided not to let her condition define her. >> i longed to accept myself and my autism and i realized that my autism isn't what defines me. i define what is autism. >> she entered the miss montana pageant as a way to problem she could do anything. >> i fell in love with the program, good thing too because i won. i wasn't expecting to win but it's funny how things work
of alexis de tocqueville. the tocqueville wrote democracy in america two generations after the american founding. two generations after madison identified the tyranny of the majority as the distinctively worse political outcome the democracy could produce to feed the tocqueville, however, had a different answer than that ascended to the question of what kind of despotism space nations have to fear. his warming is justly famous and more pertinent now than ever. this despotism that will lead to tocqueville what he say was mild than the traditional despotisms but coming in here i put them at length the modern despotism leave men without granting them. it is absolute, detailed, regular, farsi and my old. it would resemble paternal power if like that and have for its object to prepare men for manhood but on the contrary it seems only to keep them fixed. it willingly works for their happiness but it wants to be the unique agent and sole arbiter of the happiness. it provides for their security and for their needs, facilitates the pleasures, conductor principal fares, directs their industries,
to meet our obligations. that's not who we are. major, then alexis. >> as you noted, jay, the situation in algeria is very fluid and you are trying to discern fact from fiction. once that process is finished, does the president intend to communicate with the country about what he knows and what has happened? >> well, i think -- i have no scheduling announcements to make on behalf of the president, and i think we're focused now on finding out and seeking clarity about the events in algeria. and once we know more and once we have more that we can convey to you, we'll make assessments based on that. >> does the white house believe that there is something at work in mali or algeria that is moving or shifting in a way that's maybe catching the american public's attention for the first time? threat patterns? different areas of conflict? an aggressiveness on al qaeda or affiliates that needs perhaps more communication with the american public, a greater sense of what's actually going on here? >> we here in the white house and throughout the administration are intensely focused on al qaeda and
on to wisconsin. we'll send it back to alexis davies in for danella. >>> thank you, two southbound lanes are closed on route 355 wisconsin avenue between cumberland avenue and dorset avenue. elsewhere, 270 seeing delays as you head out of frederick this morning and as you approach the [ male announcer ] now at your neighborhood subway: the big hot pastrami melt. we perfected the pastrami sandwich -- filled with hot, juicy pastrami, pickles, yellow mustard and bubbly melted cheese. all piled-high on our signature freshly baked bread. made hot, toasty and just for you. and don't be afraid to put your spin on this deli style deliciousity -- add your favorite ingredients, like spicy jalapeƑos or crisp green peppers. get to your local subway and taste some perfect pastrami today! subway. eat fresh. >>> good morning, sun just now coming up over the potomac and a clearing sky. live view and the sun will be with us throughout the rest of the daylight hours with temperatures struggle to get above freezing over the next hour so right now reagan national at 31. elsewhere, down into the low to mid
. >> john is okay. >> so, alexis who scared everybody is trying to change his image. met with stroible of germany. how's it going? >> it's going well. he is not someone to be scared about. he's a politician who says the obvious. that in europe, and especially in greece, we need change. we need to move away from austerity. austerity creates a lot of unemployment, is a negative spiral of recession, more austerity, more recession. and so nowadays in greece, we have 26% of the workforce being unemployed. >> right. >> and this percent is more than 50% among the -- >> you know what, a lot of economists around the world would say, though, the solutions that you want would also lead to higher unemployment, because you don't want to necessarily lower wages, or lower the minimum wage. you want to keep union control in place, and so things that make greece -- greek very uncompetitive in the world market. they're more expensive relative to other potential employers around the world. >> have a different analogy. greece is a custom intensive country, it's not a labor intensive country. besides it's
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)